The law regarding overtime in Ohio is changing. The new law takes effect on July 3, 2019, according to the Ohio Revised Code. Many of the rules stay the same as they were, but there may be some slight changes that could affect you. So, it is important to find out what the new law says, so you know what to expect.

To begin with, the overtime rate stays the same. If you work more than forty hours in one week, then your employer must pay you time and a half. This means if you regularly make $10 an hour, when working overtime, your employer must pay you $15 an hour. There are exceptions to this general rule. If you work in agriculture or some motor carrier positions, then your employer does not have to pay overtime in this manner. Do note that the motor carrier changes are the main change in the law from prior to July 3, 2019.

In some cases, your employer may offer paid time off instead of overtime pay. This is reserved for county employees. In addition, if your employer does not have a revenue of over $150,000, then this overtime law may not apply.

It is also important to note that the concept of an employee under this law also does not include babysitters, those under 18 years old working for a non-profit camp, government employees, and newspaper delivery persons. You may want to verify with your employer that you work in a position that is able to earn overtime. This information is for education and is not legal advice.